The World's First Video Game Brothel

Posted by Staff
GameCrush thinks you are sad, lonely and desperately in need of some female company. It hopes to make money from this assumption. In a nutshell the site sets up players (guys) with playdates (girls) and charges them for the privilege.

GameCrush is keen to point out that, "PlayDates can make up to $30 or more per hour while having fun playing online games. After a game session is completed, Players rate their gaming experience, and top-rated PlayDates are rewarded with enhanced site promotion and additional benefits."

No matter how you read that, it's paying girls per hour to have fun with them.

The company explains that, "On GameCrush, players can find their perfect PlayDate through browsing their profiles and chatting live with them. Players can then purchase a live one-on-one private gaming session, complete with two-way video and text chat."

The site makes half an attempt to pitch itself as a social/dating site, describing itself as an "interactive social gaming experience allowing gamers to meet, match and pay to play online games with other users". It's not, of course. It's a chatline, and the only way you're spending any more time with the girl you just gamed with is to fork out another $6.60 USD for 10 more minutes of her time.

It is, of course, genius. Cynical, exploitative and a little bit evil, but definitely genius.

The service is in beta right now, but the site was down at the time of publication, apparently "due to the incredible user response (more than 10,000 inquiries in five minutes)". Currently, only web-based flash games and Xbox LIVE are available, but GameCrush plans to expand to take in the PS3 and World of Warcraft.

Full press release here.

Here's a video:

Discover Simple, Private Sharing at Drop.io
Companies:

Comments

ted 6 Oct 2010 17:34
1/1
lol, thats funny
Posting of new comments is now locked for this page.

Latest

Moonlighter Preview
Mike Dies Preview
Keyboard Sports Preview
Yooka-Laylee Review
Keen Preview
Hot Lava Preview
Uno Review